Korean Restaurants in Seal Beach

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The Flame Broiler founder Young Lee found himself eating out of paper bags quite often. His career required a great deal of travel during the day, which made eating from fast food restaurants a habit. Unfortunately, his options for healthier, quick-service fare left him craving something different. In 1995, he took matters into his own hands and opened the first Flame Broiler location, serving Korean-style slices of beef and chicken that were free of dairy, trans-fat, HFCS, and added MSG. He didn't just take away harmful ingredients, though?he also added his signature Flame Broiler marinade and sauce, beds of white and brown rice, and slices of crisp vegetables. This more nutritious take on fast food caught on, as diners can now eat at 135 Flame Broiler locations in four different states and two parallel universes.

11182 Los Alamitos Blvd
Los Alamitos,
CA
US

At Sura Korean BBQ & Tofu, meat and tofu put aside their differences in the name of cooperating to create savory Korean feasts. Bulgogi—sliced beef marinated in 12 flavorful ingredients—stars in many dishes, from japche rice-paper wraps to custom-made bibimbap served in a hot stone pot. Instead of sculpting faux turkeys from vatfuls of guacamole, vegans can build feasts from meat-free dishes such as tofu soup and sushi-like kimchi kimbap. The restaurant's popular korean tacos encourage meats and greens to hang out together, housing combinations of bulgogi, pork, chicken, veggies, or tofu. Outdoor seating invites patrons to dine amid verdant plants, whereas comfy indoor booths honor nature with sunny lights and bamboo wall coverings.

621 Atlantic Ave
Long Beach,
CA
US

Corea Kalbi aims to serve healthy Korean BBQ by using top quality meats that are free from MSG and offering fresh and light options such as seared Chilean sea bass and octopus cucumber salad. Their menu also includes savory dishes such as boneless bulgogi and marinated short ribs that patrons can feast upon or bring home to please their carnivorous pet dragons.

1701 Corinthian Way
Newport Beach,
CA
US

We have a large selection of dishes from Korean, Chinese, Japanese, American and other cuisines. The buffet provides an international dining opportunity, allowing customers to experience new dishes, new cuisines and favorite dishes at reasonable prices.

1925 W Olympic Blvd
Los Angeles,
CA
US

In true Korean barbecue form, the grills at Park’s BBQ aren’t in the kitchen—they’re set into the tables where customers sit. This way, they can watch as strips of kobe-style beef, pork belly, and short ribs cook to just the right temperature. Park’s BBQ orders their cuts of USDA prime beef in small daily deliveries, which means that each morsel is impeccably fresh; a fair trade-off for the risk that some selections from the barbecue menu occasionally sell out. If they do, a selection of main and side dishes prepared by the staff do just fine. LA Weekly reporter Jonathan Gold especially enjoyed the “wondrous” small-plate appetizers of egg pancakes, small fish, and kimchi, along with the cold buckwheat noodles in soup known as naengymyon. Everything is served in the restaurant’s ultramodern dining room, where black tables sit beneath powerful, stainless steel fans that whisk away any smoke emitted by the tabletop grills and any bad jokes emitted by dining partners.

955 S Vermont Ave
Los Angeles,
CA
US

At Hae Jang Chon, the dolgooi, a traditional stone grill, is literally at the center of every meal. The circular stones sit in the middle of each table, two-inch-thick slabs that heat up as diners peruse the menu of meats. Most patrons order the all-you-can-eat buffet, for which parties of two or more can choose up to four meats for each round. Servers bring the raw morsels tableside, and arrange them on the grill to a growing chorus of sizzles. Diners look on as cuts of Black Angus beef brisket, baby octopus, squid, and beef bulgogi quickly brown, then pluck them from the slab with chopsticks, pile them on kimchi pancakes and steamed rice, and adorn them with pickled veggies and spicy sauces from a bounty of traditional garnishes. The drink list keeps with the Korean spirit, and includes herbal rice wine, Korean vodka, and pints of Hite.

3821 W 6th St
Los Angeles,
CA
US