Movies in Kenmore


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  • Dipson Theatres
    Dipson Theatres celebrates a reputation as a regional movie institution with a network of 9 locations lighting 46 silver screens across Michigan, New York, and Pennsylvania. Though the company now spreads across the northeast United States, it began in the small city of Batavia, NY, in 1939?a time when movies were called ?picture shows,? Roosevelt was in the White House, and everybody could only see in black and white. Today that tradition underlies the cinematic experience as patrons chomp popcorn and sip sodas, marveling at modern 3-D visual adventures, summer action movies, family-friendly features, or even indie art flicks and footage from world-renowned opera performances.
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    639 Main St.
    Buffalo, NY CA
  • TJ's Dinner Theatre
    TJ's Dinner Theatre serves up classic American food and entertainment in a casual setting. Cooks prepare burgers, pizzas, and giant soft pretzels while patrons relax and watch movies. Though the theater opened in its current location in February 2013, its centerpiece is much older: "Shirley," the projector that casts movies onto the big screen, has been in use since 1949, reports metroWNY.
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    97 N Main St.
    Angola, NY US
  • Niagara Falls IMAX & Daredevil Exhibit
    A 15,000-watt lamp projector, six-channel surround sound playing from 44 speakers, and a six-story screen that reaches to the very edge of your peripheral vision. With larger-than-life audio and visual displays, Niagara Falls IMAX puts audiences right in the action. The current film, Niagara: Miracles, Myths & Magic, explores the 12,000-year history of the falls and highlights the daredevils who plunged over the cascading waters inside barrels or the open mouths of whales. Just outside of the theater, the Niagara Daredevil Exhibit delves deeper into the stories of those thrill seekers. Here, visitors can learn more about the lives of Niagara Falls daredevils and even touch some of the barrels that carried them over the falls and into legend.
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    6170 Fallsview Blvd
    Niagara Falls, ON CA
  • Projection Booth Cinema
    Since opening as the Bonita Theatre in 1911, the city's oldest movie house has undergone numerous transformations, most recently screening Chinese and Hindi films throughout the '80s and '90s and Tamil-language films in the current millennium. Big Picture Cinema is its latest incarnation, specializing in independent and world cinema. Grinder Coffee, the theatre's next door neighbour, concocts gourmet concessions, meals, and coffee for moviegoers before they saunter down the theatre's wood-to-concrete floor and sink into one of 295 seats, lined with marine blue corduroy. As 5.1 Dolby digital surround sound orbits the audience, 35mm and digital projectors showcase premieres of films that eschew traditional Hollywood fare, including a monthly horror film series in partnership with Fangoria Magazine and weekly Bollywood film reels discovered in the theatre basement during renovations. Local artists also showcase their work each Wednesday followed by coffee and discussion sessions with the audience, where they can ask guest moviemakers about the creative process or how to talk actors out of staying in pirate character during visits to the dentist.
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    1035 Gerrard St East
    Toronto, ON CA
  • Magic Lantern Theatre–Carlton Cinema
    At Magic Lantern Theatres, darkened auditoriums with flickering screens draw audiences into magical worlds where fish can talk, motorcycles leap canyons, and love comes even for those who eat crackers in bed. The partnering multiplex theatres and cinemas show recently released blockbuster flicks at 15 locations spread across Canada, each of which retains its own unique personality and honours any historic roots. In Edmonton, the Princess Theatre?s original 1915 auditorium, complete with balcony, golden drapes, and red walls, accommodates moviegoers with babies or pet hyenas inside a soundproof cry room. In Saskatchewan, the circa-1930 Roxy Theatre preserves the ambience of a Spanish courtyard. As guests find their auditoriums at the Ontario locations, they can admire giant murals by local artist Fred Harrison.
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    20 Carlton Street
    Toronto, ON CA
  • Revue Cinema
    Established: Before 1950 Staff Size: 2?10 people Average Duration of Services: 2?4 hours Brands Used: Pepsi Pro Tip: Box office opens 30 minutes before showtime. Arrive early to get the best seat. Handicap Accessible: No Parking: Metered street parking Recommended Age Group: All Ages For Susan Flanagan, the Revue Cinema was almost a lost cause. Back in 2006, the theatre had all but shuttered its doors, and was on the brink of closing down for good. Susan hit the streets and pounded the porches in the neighborhood, sold "Save the Revue" t-shirts and buttons, wrote press releases, and did just about everything in her power to raise enough money to keep the theater going. In the processes, she effectively recruited a battalion of volunteers?Revue Film Society?who not only helped with funding, but dedicated their collective manpower to help clean, paint, and even create new art deco light fixtures for the theater for its grand re-opening. Today, Revue Cinema?a not-for-profit theatre?screens films that range from blockbuster hits to cult classics. In addition to showing new releases, the staff arranges a series of cultural programs such as Silent Sundays, where live piano accompaniment adds vim to North American and European films from the 1910s and 1920s. And in addition to the movies, the snack bar sets the bar for other theatres by selling organic juices and vintage-style pop and candy.
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    400 Roncesvalles Ave.
    Toronto, ON CA

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