In Los Angeles, Botox is widespread, just like many cosmetic procedures. (It makes sense in a city where good looks can get you onto a movie set with George Clooney. Or the Transformers.) People who get Botox injections usually don’t look like they do, though—a testament to the artistry of the city’s Botox providers. And these providers are everywhere, from hospitals in Los Angeles to LA spas. One provider, aesthetic physician assistant Emily Dowe of Epithereal Skin Care in Marina del Rey, told us seven things clients should know before they head in for their first injection: 1. Botox can prevent wrinkles.“I think LA is ahead of the curve on preventative [Botox],” Dowe said. Botox can combat existing wrinkles, she explained, but it can also help prevent crow’s-feet and “11s”—the industry term for wrinkles between the eyebrows. 2. But it can’t do everything.“One important note for all patients, whether first time or repeat: lines that have already formed and are etched into the skin may only soften, not completely [disappear],” she said. So while it can combat signs of aging, it can't stop time.3. Exact longevity varies.Most Botox injections last three to six months, Dowe said, though “each person is different, and their metabolism rate varies.” That means the exact length of time an injection lasts can differ, even from session to session for a single patient. Patients looking for longer-lasting results should check out other injectables, such as Juvéderm. 4. The needle’s nothing to be scared of. “When it comes to Botox, the needle is so small, a mosquito bite would hurt more,” Dowe said. “At Epithereal, we use very small insulin syringes, which in some patients do not even leave a pin mark." 5. Overall, Botox is safe. If you’re still nervous, Dowe reassures patients that “Botox is a very stable product that is used virtually every day by so many in our industry.” 6. Botox doesn’t affect everyone exactly the same way. No matter how much your friends swear by it, “each individual experience is different and [every patient’s] body and facial structure will react in its own way,” Dowe said. 7. Do your homework. "It is important to always inquire about the person who will be injecting you and what their background is," she said. "Make sure the provider you are seeking is an authorized facility."
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