Movies in Oshawa


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  • Projection Booth Cinema
    Since opening as the Bonita Theatre in 1911, the city's oldest movie house has undergone numerous transformations, most recently screening Chinese and Hindi films throughout the '80s and '90s and Tamil-language films in the current millennium. Big Picture Cinema is its latest incarnation, specializing in independent and world cinema. Grinder Coffee, the theatre's next door neighbour, concocts gourmet concessions, meals, and coffee for moviegoers before they saunter down the theatre's wood-to-concrete floor and sink into one of 295 seats, lined with marine blue corduroy. As 5.1 Dolby digital surround sound orbits the audience, 35mm and digital projectors showcase premieres of films that eschew traditional Hollywood fare, including a monthly horror film series in partnership with Fangoria Magazine and weekly Bollywood film reels discovered in the theatre basement during renovations. Local artists also showcase their work each Wednesday followed by coffee and discussion sessions with the audience, where they can ask guest moviemakers about the creative process or how to talk actors out of staying in pirate character during visits to the dentist.
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    1035 Gerrard St East
    Toronto, ON CA
  • Magic Lantern Theatre–Carlton Cinema
    At Magic Lantern Theatres, darkened auditoriums with flickering screens draw audiences into magical worlds where fish can talk, motorcycles leap canyons, and love comes even for those who eat crackers in bed. The partnering multiplex theatres and cinemas show recently released blockbuster flicks at 15 locations spread across Canada, each of which retains its own unique personality and honours any historic roots. In Edmonton, the Princess Theatre?s original 1915 auditorium, complete with balcony, golden drapes, and red walls, accommodates moviegoers with babies or pet hyenas inside a soundproof cry room. In Saskatchewan, the circa-1930 Roxy Theatre preserves the ambience of a Spanish courtyard. As guests find their auditoriums at the Ontario locations, they can admire giant murals by local artist Fred Harrison.
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    20 Carlton Street
    Toronto, ON CA
  • Revue Cinema
    Established: Before 1950 Staff Size: 2?10 people Average Duration of Services: 2?4 hours Brands Used: Pepsi Pro Tip: Box office opens 30 minutes before showtime. Arrive early to get the best seat. Handicap Accessible: No Parking: Metered street parking Recommended Age Group: All Ages For Susan Flanagan, the Revue Cinema was almost a lost cause. Back in 2006, the theatre had all but shuttered its doors, and was on the brink of closing down for good. Susan hit the streets and pounded the porches in the neighborhood, sold "Save the Revue" t-shirts and buttons, wrote press releases, and did just about everything in her power to raise enough money to keep the theater going. In the processes, she effectively recruited a battalion of volunteers?Revue Film Society?who not only helped with funding, but dedicated their collective manpower to help clean, paint, and even create new art deco light fixtures for the theater for its grand re-opening. Today, Revue Cinema?a not-for-profit theatre?screens films that range from blockbuster hits to cult classics. In addition to showing new releases, the staff arranges a series of cultural programs such as Silent Sundays, where live piano accompaniment adds vim to North American and European films from the 1910s and 1920s. And in addition to the movies, the snack bar sets the bar for other theatres by selling organic juices and vintage-style pop and candy.
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    400 Roncesvalles Ave.
    Toronto, ON CA
  • Fox Theatre
    In 1913, Arthur Brooks Webster had a problem: he had just been issued a permit to build his theatre, but the local residents were already content with the two theatres just down the road. However, by promising a moviegoing experience unlike any other and rallying his friends to spread a petition door-to-door, Webster gained the support he needed to break the earth on his vision. Though the theatre?s first reel spun in 1914, it took years of cycling through names such as The Pastime and Prince Edward before it finally received its current, more svelte moniker in 1937. Fast-forward to the present day, and the Fox Theatre stands as the longest-running cinema in Canada. First- and second-run films flicker to life on the big screen as enamoured audiences watch on from rows of plush red seats. Aside from the classic moviegoing experience, the theatre may be rented to seat up to 248 spectators for parties, corporate events, and screenings of independent documentaries about the funding channels for independent documentaries.
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    2236 Queen St. E
    Toronto, ON CA
  • Bloor Cinema
    Visit the historic Bloor Hot Docs Cinema to view fun films and intriguing documentaries. Opened in 1913, this cinema is in Toronto’s dynamic Annex neighborhood. The open and airy interior features both floor and balcony seating, perfect for viewing the large projection screen. Now under the new management of Hot Doc, Bloor Cinema plays an exciting selection of Canadian and international documentaries to choose from all year round. They also host special documentary presentations and showcases, including the must-see Doc Soup Series. The Bloor Cinema is part of the new culturally rich Bloor St. Culture Corridor. They also follow an earth-friendly green initiative by using 100 percent green electricity through Bullfrog Power.
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    506 Bloor St W
    Toronto, ON CA
  • The Docks Driving Range and Drive-in movie theatre
    Nothing says “classic date night” quite like a drive-in movie under the stars. This waterside outdoor theater takes the timeless activity a few steps further by adding soft lake breezes, first-run blockbusters, and dynamic in-car sound to the mix. An added bonus: classic movie eats at the fully-loaded snack bar.
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    176 Cherry Street
    Toronto, ON CA

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