BBQ Restaurants in West Lake Stevens

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Carolina Smoke's pitmasters release bold, succulent taste bursts with a slow-smoked menu of down-home eats. All meats are hand-rubbed and eye-watched, never pre-cloaked in flavor-smothering sauces or frowny-face masks. Sink teeth into the tender beef-brisket sandwich ($10) or delve deep into the flavor furnace with a prime rib ($21). Diners can further slake smoky cravings with a half or full rack of baby-back ribs ($14, $22) or feed famished fingers a gratifying grip of hot wings ($10). The restaurant's policy of allowing eaters to add their own sauce permits patrons to customize flavoring and ink unique impressions on napkin and facial canvases. Behind the eatery's shingled sides and white shutters, dining-room guests can bookend bites with sips of Carolina sweet tea.

23806 Bothell Everett Hwy
Bothell,
WA
US

5803 244th St SW
Mountlake Terrace,
WA
US

Featured in Seattle magazine and The Seattle Times, Kaya Korean Barbecue prides itself on its attentive service, posh presentation, massive portions, and a second-story location safe from dinner-interrupting tiger stampedes. Platoons of food soldiers can arm themselves with massive appetizers such as the marinated raw beef ($15.99) before focusing their attention on the feast as it arrives in steaming hot rock bowls. Choose from a variety of dishes ranging from the Angus marinated short ribs ($27.99) to soft tofu soup ($10.99), or go for an authentic barbecue experience by searing enormous platters of sizzling meats on the minigrill located in the center of your table, with selections such as the Kaya combo for four (Angus rib eye, marinated short ribs, marinated sirloin, beef brisket, beef tongue, bean paste stew, and your choice of beverages) ($96.99). Overhanging vents inhale the mouthwatering barbecue odors that would otherwise cling to clothes for days, ensuring that diners are not tempted to try out new recipes at home such as blouse jerky and deep-fried pants. In addition to grilluminating guests, Kaya pours copious cupfuls of Korean rice wine and beer.

20109 Aurora Ave N
Shoreline,
WA
US

Padded black booths surround grills beneath gleaming hoods, which reflect the glow of sunset-orange walls as they sweep away rising warm air and spice-steeped aromas. On Palace Korean Bar & Grill's tabletop skillets, chefs sizzle menu items such as pearlescent curlicues of kimchi and cuts of seafood as well as bulgogi, spicy slices of brisket also known as Korean barbecue. During the all-you-can-eat special, silverware jangles endlessly like a knight looking for his car keys as diners tuck into bottomless helpings of marinated beef short ribs, tender marble brisket, spicy pork belly, and jumbo shrimp.

15932 NE 8th St
Bellevue,
WA
US

Dan and Janell Fullen founded DJ's Barbecue to spread their smoked ribs, sauce-slathered meat sandwiches, and housemade specialty sauces to the local community. As Washington natives, the Fullens have their own way of imbuing their ribs, meats, and sandwiches with Northwestern panache, such as marinating them in the rarefied air atop the Space Needle. They use their 25 years of experience in the restaurant-management industry to smoke 3/4-pound baby back ribs or fulfill carryout orders of pulled pork and beef brisket by the pound.

3943 116th St NE, Ste 113
Marysville,
WA
US

The story of Brown's Coffee Café begins in Europe during World War II, where the wartime experiences of Virgil Brown, owner Neal Brown's father, motivated him to seek a peaceful, provincial life. In the 1960s, Virgil moved the family to the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia in search of this tranquil existence. But although the Brown clan found life on their 400-acre dairy farm fulfilling, the hard economic realities of dairy farming drove the family back to urban living.

Years later, when happenstance flung Neal into the world of coffee, his days on the farm filled him with sympathy for coffee farmers who harvested beans for menial wages, out of sight and out of mind for the coffee drinkers abroad enjoying the fruits of their labors. Neal therefore resolved that his shop would use only fair-trade beans that were free of chemicals and pesticides and capable of providing an honest wage to hard-working farmers. Eventually, like a popcorn kernel under an interrogation lamp, the café expanded, and it now includes a menu of chorizo burritos, cuban pulled-pork sandwiches, and other fare that represents the traditions of numerous nations, just as Neal's story does.

1502 NE 179th St
Shoreline,
WA
US