Clubs in New York City


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When The Hill first opened, people speculated that Heidi and Spencer Pratt of The Hills were behind the venture. That was just a rumor. The spot actually takes its name from its neighborhood, not the Los Angeles reality show. Now that the initial mystery surrounding The Hill has lifted, the pub has become a neighborhood go-to for catching the game while sipping drinks and devouring philly sliders, baskets of crispy tater tots, and pots of fondue. A Reflection of Murray Hill As New York Times reporter Jeff Vandam explains, Murray Hill is a hard neighborhood to pin down. Quiet rows of brownstones and apartment buildings contrast with a lively pub scene geared toward the 20-somethings who have recently become more of a fixture in recent years. Like the neighborhood it calls home, The Hill has somewhat of a split personality. From afternoon to early evening, it is predominantly a sports bar, with more than 25 high-definition televisions broadcasting live games in the bar and upstairs lounge. As soon as the action wraps up, though, things start to get interesting. Candlelight replaces the flickering glow of television screens, and the bar transforms into a stylish lounge for Murray Hill?s sophisticated set. An Upscale Pub Setting The Hill welcomes postcollegiate fans to cheer on their alma maters in a setting that's far more refined than that of a typical sports bar. Chandeliers glimmer overhead, and leather cushions line long booths. Polychromatic planks of wood line the walls on both floors, giving guests something interesting to admire when the bartenders take a break from stirring lemon-drop martinis or pouring glasses of watermelon sangria.
416 3rd Avenue
New York,
NY
US
For spaghetti and meatballs that tug at the heartstrings, Phoenix Park creates a warm atmosphere perfect for two. Plan to indulge a bit at Phoenix Park, though, because they don't offer any low-fat fare. With Phoenix Park's wide selection of refreshments available, you can tap into the drink menu early in the evening. Just around the workday bend are Phoenix Park's happy hour food and drink bargains. Summer meals will taste even better when you enjoy them on Phoenix Park's gorgeous patio. Stay in the loop (and online!) by tapping into Phoenix Park's free wifi hotspot. Big parties won't feel squeezed in at Phoenix Park, which offers great seating for large groups. Heading over after work? Make sure to call ahead to reserve your table since crowds tend to pack Phoenix Park on weeknights. Not a popular place for dress-up dining, most Phoenix Park patrons come in casual attire. Dining out isn't your only option here — pickup is available, too. Guests take to street parking at Phoenix Park's E 67th St spot. Expect your bill at Phoenix Park to come in at around $30 per person. Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express are all accepted.
206 E 67th St
New York,
NY
US
A ceiling fan gently spins overhead and lush potted bamboo flourishes in the corner. Painted shutters and rattan chairs give the dining room an outdoor feel as light trickles in through French doors. At Le Colonial, the Upper East Side becomes the other side of the world and the final element of transport is the restaurant’s French-Vietnamese fare. The delicate pairing harks back to the 1920s, when France maintained colonial rule over Southeast Asia, and is evident in everything from the flavors to the chefs’ cooking techniques. The dinner menu here is divided in two sections, but not the ones you might expect: From the Land and From the Sea. Banana leaf-wrapped sea bass over glass noodles represents the glory of the former, while roast duck with tamarind dipping sauce stands out from the latter. The restaurant’s light yet flavorful fare—which even covers sautéed filet mignon with Asian long beans—makes lasting impressions, and did so for reporter Julie Wilcox of Forbes: “I consider [Le Colonial] one of the most consistent and best Upper East Asian Restaurants,” she wrote in a 2012 article.
149 E 57th St
New York,
NY
US
Copia NYC offers a laid-back atmosphere and tasty American classics. If you're avoiding fat or gluten, you can still eat well at Copia NYC, which offers a number of low-fat and gluten-free choices. Unwind with a glass of wine or cocktail with your meal — Copia NYC has a wonderful selection of drinks to accompany your dinner. Take advantage of great beer and tasty bites when you stop by for happy hour. Plan your next big gathering at Copia NYC — patrons will appreciate the spacious interior, and there's even a private room for special occasions. Copia NYC also features a DJ and dancing. Loud music and boisterous crowds keep decibel levels ultra high at this restaurant. People tend to swarm the restaurant on Fridays and Saturdays, so be sure to reserve space for your party ahead of time. Catering services are also available. You can leave your car curbside with nearby street parking. Typical diners should plan to spend about $30 per person on Copia NYC's moderately priced fare.
307 E 53rd St
New York,
NY
US
This cocktail hotspot takes more than just its name from Frenchman Paul Verlaine, a 19th-century poet and notorious hedonist. The drink menu is carefully orchestrated to indulge almost any fancy—libations range from dozens of small-batch and single-barrel whiskeys to sake and cocktails that have a distinct South Asian flair. Lychee sweetens the popular Hanoi Martini and black raspberry sake adds subtle notes to the exotic Saigon Bellini. Vietnamese flavors also inspire the eclectic tapas menu, which features several vegetarian-friendly options. Lemongrass sauce sweetens a stack of pancakes, and chicken or shrimp bulks up coconut curry. At Verlaine, there's no flashy décor to distract from the craft food and drink. Instead, the vibe is sophisticated and subdued, with dim candles set along the length of the bar and local artwork lining the walls. The artsy theme is alive and well at occasional poetry readings, which pay homage to the bar's literary namesake.
110 Rivington Street
New York,
NY
US
The Tribeca Grand, located on Avenue of the Americas in its namesake TriBeCa neighborhood, is quickly becoming a symbol of this affluent district. Comprising the area delineated by Canal Street, Broadway, the Hudson River and Vesey Street, this formerly bohemian enclave has come to represent the super-rich, while elegant touches still showcase the Tribeca Grand’s stance as a neighborhood leader in design. A vintage clock at the hotel’s entrance marks the location, while the exterior combines the industrial elements found in loft buildings throughout the area and a post-World War II interior blends in a few modern accents. The results are nostalgic without being dated, as guests pony up for one of the 200-plus guest rooms and well-appointed suites. The aptly-named downstairs Lobby Bar stands in for a quick drink, while nearby restaurants, bars, art galleries and vintage shops in the neighborhood keep schedules packed.
2 Avenue Of The Americas
New York,
NY
US

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