Wine Bars in San Francisco


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  • Noeteca
    Noeteca‘s owners spent their lives looking forward to running their own restaurant, so it’s no surprise that the French-inspired tapas spot feels comfortable in its own skin from early morning meals until late into the night. During the day, Noeteca seems like a cafe, where patrons sip on international coffees from local roasters brewed by the cup or for personal-sized French presses. At brunch menu, familiar dishes share space with ambitious French-inspired offerings—the croque monsieur becomes a croque Napoleon with slices of bread pudding layered with black forest ham and emmantaler. When the weather is nice, guests can wander out to a patio colored by a flower and herb garden to learn the sun’s secret handshake. As evening falls, candlelight fills the dining room and guests switch their focus to wine. The award-winning list includes more than 30 varieties, each available by the glass or half-glass. For dinner, patrons can build their own cheese plates or share a tarte flambèe, Alsatian flatbreads the San Francisco Bay Guardian said have “a lovely thin, blistered crust that was a bit softer and more luxurious than a typical pizza crust”.
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    1551 Dolores St.
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Food Inc. Trattoria
    Food Inc. Trattoria seeks its inspiration from near and far. Beginning with as many locally sourced ingredients as possible, the eatery's chefs prepare seasonally rotating selections of pan-Mediterranean bistro cuisine. Menu Buzzwords Organic: A toasted baguette cradles organic mixed greens, spicy lamb sausage, and roasted-pepper aioli. Seasonal: Whenever they are available, fresh figs appear in a salad of mixed greens with sweet Italian gorgonzola and walnuts. Vegan: Creamy hummus and avocado, crisp cucumbers, asparagus, and tomato are sandwiched between slices of seeded whole-wheat bread, creating a vegan-friendly dish. Homemade: Chefs hand make each piece of ricotta gnocchi before cooking the dumplings and adding prosciutto, peas, and cream sauce. The Wine Cellar Rather than stick with just the basics, Food Inc. Trattoria's wine buyer hopes to introduce diners to lesser known varietals and winemaking regions. Greek moschofilero, French picpoul de pinet, and a rosé of Californian carignan represent a few choices from the everchanging list. The staff eagerly recommends bottles to share with a group of friends or newly discovered spirit animals.
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    2800 California St
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Candybar
    Of all the hooting and victory dancing coming from the group in the corner booth, only half of the commotion is a result of the game of Sorry! the group is immersed in. The other half occurs during breaks in the action when the competitors dig into the decadent morsels in front of them—desserts forged from ingredients such as rum mascarpone cream and homemade marshmallow. Evenings of spirited merrymaking capped with sweet treats are standard at Candybar, where seasoned pastry chef Cathleen Li handcrafts a rotating menu of cakes, ice creams, and sorbets. To complement Li’s signature desserts, mixologists further tantalize taste buds with inventive cocktails, such as the strawberry kiss. Throughout the candlelit dining room, minimalist bulbs dangle from ceiling tracks, casting dancing shadows across plush red couches, black-and-white damask poufs, and contemporary artwork. A collection of board games infuses the dessert lounge’s chic atmosphere with a touch of whimsy and encourages good-natured rivalries between friends or high-stakes games to determine who gets the last bite of the ice-cream sundae.
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    1335 Fulton St.
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Nectar Wine Lounge
    For the freshest Californian fare, head over to San Francisco's Nectar Wine Lounge. For conscientious eaters, Nectar Wine Lounge has plenty fresh and healthy items on the menu. For those searching for something other than a beer or cocktail, be sure to scan the wine list. The bar also provides TVs in the bar area, so you can stay entertained with your drink of choice. Ideal for birthday parties or other large get-togethers, Nectar Wine Lounge has all the room you'll need to be comfortable. Sit outside at Nectar Wine Lounge and soak up the sun on those nice summer days. Stay connected at no cost thanks to Nectar Wine Lounge's wifi. Weekend visitors to the bar are well advised to take advantage of the reservation system — crowds tend to pack the place on Fridays and Saturdays. Show up in sneakers or a suit at Nectar Wine Lounge, where dining in comfort is of utmost importance. Guests of Nectar Wine Lounge's Steiner St location can park their vehicles on the street. Nectar Wine Lounge is a mid-priced establishment, with the average meal costing under $30.
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    3330 Steiner St
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Mission Cheese
    Mission Cheese: A User’s Guide Artisanal American Cheese | Wine Bar | Craft Beer and Cider | Housemade Pickles | Farmhouse-Inspired Decor Sample Menu Appetizer: charcuterie plate of shredded duck, housemade pickles, and quince butter Entree: mac & cheese with clothbound cheddar, washed rind cow’s-milk cheese, and toasted breadcrumbs Wine: zinfandel, County Line, Russian River Dessert: milk and cookies, baked to order Where to Sit: the bar. Crafted from a single slab of wood, it’s the epicenter of Mission Cheese. You’ll get to see the cheesemongers in their element as they select cheeses from the glass cooling cases. While You’re Waiting Grab a copy of the current drink list. The wine, beer, and cider offerings update frequently. Look at the pickling jars lining the shelves and guess what’s in each one. You’ll see all kinds of house-pickled veggies, such as carrots, cauliflower, and California-grown olives. Inside Tips Treat yourself to a cheese flight. Between the rotating selection and the cheesemongers’ whims, it’s unlikely you’ll ever get the same flight twice. The iced coffee isn’t chilled hot coffee. It’s cold-brewed for at least 12 hours using beans from Fort Bragg–based Thanksgiving Coffee Company. Vocab Lesson Cheesemonger: an expert in cheese. Cheesemongers also tend to have great knowledge in other forms or dairy, such as butter and cream, as well as in breads, fruits, and other foods that help bring out the flavors in cheese. Levain: French for “leaven,” the word is sometimes used interchangeably with sourdough. While You’re in the Neighborhood Before: Peruse vintage furnishings at The Apartment (3649 18th Street), a resale shop known for its funky, eclectic selection. After: Indulge in small-batch confections at Dandelion Chocolate (740 Valencia Street), which calls itself “a bean-to-bar chocolate factory.”
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    736 Valencia Street
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Barrique
    Barrique What’s in a label? Drinking wine simply for the joy of it is what Barrique is all about. In fact, in-house winemaker Matthew Weese keeps the source of his eight on-tap barrel wines—made by California wineries in Napa, Sonoma, and other regions—under wraps to ensure the experience is more about what’s in the glass than what’s on the bottle. Though these private-label barrel wines rotate, Weese often tries to include two of the same varietal produced by separate wineries to give tastings an extra layer. Though Barrique’s French name literally translates to “barrel”, the barrel wines aren’t the only stars of the show. Around 60 other wines from around the world come by the bottle, and a handful can even arrive by the glass. Additionally, a curated craft-beer menu assembles brews from the West Coast, Colorado, and Chicago. With so many options to choose from and a friendly staff of aficionados, it’s no wonder Barrique’s modern, yet rustic interior fills up with laid-back crowds interested in unwinding with drinks while picking at cheese plates and Mediterranean-inspired snacks. California Wine Regions: Microclimate Magic California’s rich, diverse soils and proximity to ocean breezes make the state a prime location for lots of grape varieties to thrive. Below is a guide to help you understand the difference between the various wine-producing regions of The Golden State. Central Coast: More than 200 years ago, Franciscan monks started growing here. Once a part of the ocean’s floor, the unique soil is ideal for growing pinot noirs, chardonnays, and bordeaux varietals. North Coast: Home to Napa and Sonoma wine country, this region’s 800+ wineries make up almost half of California’s total number. It doesn’t hurt that practically any kind of grape can grow in its warm climate, either. Sacramento Valley: The soil here produces some of the state’s finest chardonnays and zinfandels thanks to the Mediterranean-like weather and the water that flows from nearby mountain ranges. San Joaquin Valley: Its moniker as “the fruit basket of the world” is no understatement. Extremely rich soil and a climate like that of Southern Italy helps produce fruitier wine varieties, such as grenache and sauvignon blanc. Sierra Foothills: The high elevation, which starts at 1,500 feet, and volcanic soil produce deep grapevine roots perfect for producing syrahs and zinfandels. South Coast: If you want to know where winemaking started in California, look no further than San Juan Capistrano. After the Gold Rush, the gold workers who stayed became farmers who began producing clean-tasting grapes for chardonnay and pinot grigio.
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    461 Pacific Avenue
    San Francisco, CA US

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