Steakhouses in Daly City


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  • Outback Steakhouse
    Craving steak? Head down to Outback Steakhouse in Daly City and choose your own cut of perfectly marbled beef. Outback Steakhouse is a local eatery that serves up both gluten-free and low-fat dishes. Outback Steakhouse visitors can also take advantage of the many drink options offered here. Outback Steakhouse is a terrific spot for families to gather with its kid-friendly ambience and menu. During the summer months, don't miss out on Outback Steakhouse's outdoor patio seating. Have a large group? No problem. Head to Outback Steakhouse for easy seating. Outback Steakhouse tosses the jacket-and-tie dress code convention in favor of a more casual dining experience. Dining out isn't your only option here — pickup is available, too. Save some dough on parking at Outback Steakhouse. Prices are reasonable, with a typical meal running under $30.
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    371 Gellert Blvd
    Daly City, CA US
  • Harris’ The San Francisco Steakhouse
    Harris’ The San Francisco Steakhouse: A User’s Guide Live Jazz | Dry-Aged Steaks| In-House Butcher | Fine Dining | Dinner Only | 29-Page Wine List Sample Menu Cocktail: Eagle Rare Manhattan, made from 10-year-aged bourbon, available exclusively to Harris’, served with Vya sweet vermouth and a dash of Peychaud’s bitters Appetizer: sweetbreads sautéed with wild mushrooms and cream Entree: Steak Diane, a grilled paillard of filet mignon finished with a cognac demi-glace and shallots Dessert: Baked Alaska The Steak: Most of Harris’ steaks are culled from Kansas and Nebraska Angus herds, though traditional Japanese Kobe beef can also be found on the menu. Where to Sit: The main dining room features high ceilings, horseshoe booths upholstered in tufted leather, mahogany paneling, and brass fixtures. Inside Tips Limited street parking is available on Van Ness and Pacific Avenues, but valet is available for smooth entrances and exits. Harris’ does not require a jacket and tie in its main dining room, but be sure not to commit any fashion faux pas, such as shorts, sandals, or sports casual dress. Vocab Lesson Angus: cattle breed originating in Scotland, favored for its finely marbled meat that creates a more tender, juicy, and flavorful steak. Paillard: a piece of beef or veal that is pounded thin and then grilled. Sweetbreads: mellow-tasting, smooth-textured morsels taken from a lamb or calf’s thymus gland or pancreas.
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    2100 Van Ness Ave
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Epic Roasthouse
    “Every steak will have a handle.” That’s the guarantee that Epic Roasthouse chef and co-owner Jan Birnbaum offers with his bone-in steak policy; he subscribes to the belief that the best parts of any cut of beef are those closest to the bone. His patrons shouldn’t have any problem trusting his opinion, considering Julia Child once invited him to participate on her PBS series Master Chefs. Jan’s more than 30-year career has taken him to renowned restaurants around the country (including New York’s Quilted Giraffe and San Francisco’s award-winning Campton Place Hotel), where he has often experimented with dishes from his native New Orleans. Jan continues his momentum with Epic Roasthouse, a restaurant that’s recently been selected for nine of Gayot’s 2013 top-10 lists for San Francisco, including Top Steakhouses. The much-loved beef takes up the bulk of Epic’s dinner menu, with such cuts as petit filets and rib-eyes emerging from the kitchen one of seven ways (from Pittsburgh-style to well done). Each cut smokes in a custom-built wood-fired grill or a wood oven, absorbing the aroma of the almond and walnut that burn within them. The seasonal menu also features a nightly selection of house-cured meats, which might include duck prosciutto or braised oxtail terrine. The location lends just as much to Epic’s allure as the food. The building’s prime spot on the Embarcadero gives diners perfectly framed views of the Bay Bridge through large picture windows. The interior was designed by Pat Kuleto, a designer selected for a Time magazine list celebrating the last millennium’s Top 100 Innovators (guests might recognize his work from Jardinière or the Fog City Diner). The upstairs has a private dining space with a dedicated chef and kitchen, and there, guests can enjoy those same Bay-Bridge views from a private terrace.
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    369 The Embarcadero
    San Francisco, CA US
  • John's Grill
    The Three Faces of John’s Grill Upscale Steaks and Seafood John’s Grill has spent the last century honing a menu of classic Italian-American seafood, steak, and pasta recipes. The Jack LaLanne salad is a popular starter, featuring crab, shrimp, avocado, tomatoes, and mushrooms tossed in a blue-cheese vinaigrette. The signature dish—Sam Spade’s lamb chops—pays homage to a character in The Maltese Falcon, published in 1929 by novelist Dashiell Hammett, a former regular at John’s. Hammett wrote the restaurant into the detective novel, having his gumshoe order the chops with baked potato and sliced tomatoes—a combination that now lives on on John’s menu. Celebrity Clientele John’s Grill’s clientele list reads alternately like a Who’s Who of Hollywood legends—Shirley Temple, Marlon Brando, Johnny Depp—and a roll call at a G20 meeting, with names like Hillary Clinton, President Stephanopoulos of Greece, and President Zedillo of Mexico. Plenty of other big names have stopped by John’s as well, including Bill Gates, Andy Warhol, and Gore Vidal. Mysterious Disappearing Falcon In tribute to Dashiell Hammett’s novel, John’s Grill secured a replica of the the maltese falcon featured in the book’s 1941 film adaptation. The statue sat proudly on the restaurant’s second floor until 2007, when it was stolen. When a $25,000 reward failed to crack the case, the restaurant owner decided to use that money to commission a new falcon. At 150 pounds, the new bird is three times heavier than its predecessor and is bolted down to discourage thieves.
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    63 Ellis St
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Izzy's Steaks & Chops
    In 2012, Izzy?s Steaks & Chops celebrated its 25th anniversary, giving guests an excuse to reminisce about the technologies, events, and classical-music feuds that made 1987 twice as popular as 1983. Throughout the past two and a half decades, the folks in Izzy?s kitchens have been grilling up the steaks and chops that they see as an integral part of Americana, along with freshly caught local seafood that?s never frozen. All of their corn-fed Black Angus beef is humanely raised at Creekstone Farms, which is dedicated to beef free of hormones and antibiotics. The chefs transform those premium meats into their signature new york sirloin steaks, aged a minimum of 21 days, as well as cuts of slow-roasted prime rib and filet mignon medallions au poivre with pepper cream sauce. Double-cut pork also gets a boost from spiced pear. Each meal comes with a choice of two sides, such as creamed spinach, the chefs? signature potatoes au gratin, and french fries cut in the kitchen. House desserts such as new york cheesecake and key-lime pie conclude meals or quiet whining choruses of sweet teeth. Wine, cocktails, and draft beers encourage diners to linger in the cozy space, and during brunch?served only at the San Francisco location?the bartenders mix up cocktails such as peach bellinis or gaelic coffee with irish whiskey.
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    3345 Steiner St.
    San Francisco, CA US
  • Alfred's Steakhouse
    Five Things to Know About Alfred’s Steakhouse Alfred’s Steakhouse is known for it’s thick-cut, dry-aged chops. Here are a few more things to know about this classic eatery. It barely survived Prohibition. Though it opened in 1928, the steak house closed briefly due to widespread teetotalism. It reopened thanks to popular demand, and it has passed through the hands of three generations of the Petri family since then. They treat their beef with care. The staff carefully selects meat from cows raised on all-vegetarian diets free of antibiotics or hormones. The steaks are also aged, cut, and trimmed in-house. The decor recalls The Great Gatsby. Etched glass, supple leather booths, and dark wood accents are a throwback to the ‘20s. According to the New York Times, “No place...is more old-school than Alfred’s Steakhouse.” They’re open for lunch on Thursdays only. Diners can choose from wild king salmon, filet tips soaked in bourbon, or hearty dinner-sized steaks seared over mesquite charcoal. They take care of the back-of-the-house staff as well as the front. This means adding a 17% service charge to each check, which gets fairly distributed to the servers and kitchen staff.
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    659 Merchant St
    San Francisco, CA US
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