Japanese Restaurants in New York City

Select Local Merchants

Bold Asian flavors and French culinary techniques work in harmony at Amber Japanese Fusion, an Asian-fusion mainstay with multiple New York City locations. Chefs prepare specialty sushi rolls, such as the Angry Lobster, which New York magazine praised for its "tempura-battered pieces of buttery meat," and wok-seared main courses, such as sangria crispy duck. At the Kips Bay location, ascend a crimson-and-black staircase into a dining room bathed in red light and decorated with a grand Buddha statue. Alternatively, guests can head to a glass-topped bar to sip creative cocktails.

Dishes to Discover

Kumamoto Oysters XO Steak Angry Lobster Roll
Citrus dressing and golden tobiko complement the lusciously sweet flavor of deep-shelled kumamoto oysters. Chefs grill tender flank steak to perfection and then kick up the flavor with spicy XO sauce. Buttery morsels of lobster meat cloaked in crisp tempura batter make this roll a showstopper.
381 3rd Ave
New York,
NY
US

Rosanjin is named in honor of one of Japan's most celebrated potters, Roasanjin Kitaoji, so it's fitting that each course of the restaurant’s signature kaseiki dinner arrives to tables in an asymmetrical ceramic bowl. Traditional kaseiki meals follow an elaborate, stylized progression, and the chefs at Rosanjin carefully time the intervals between the eight small courses of the set menu. All the chefs at this Michelin-Star bistro have been classically trained in Kyoto, and their dedication to the execution of the kaseiki meal reflects their education. They cook each of the eight courses to order, culminating in a dining experience that can last more than two hours. The textures and presentation vary, with sashimi, fish broth, and rice balls.

There are just a handful of tables in Rosanjin's uber-chic dining room, imbuing the space with an intimate air. Within the minimalist space, owner Jungjin Park often pours hot cups of sake and chats with guests.

141 Duane Street
New York,
NY
US

You might recognize Chef Okadaman—after all, he’s in an Allman Brothers tribute band and his face is plastered onto the side of the Okadaman food truck that can be seen meandering through Midtown. Like his facility with complicated melodies and rhythms on the bass guitar, Chef Okadaman assembles virtuosic lunch entrees such as fried octopus dumplings drizzled with Japanese mayo and okonomiyaki, a savory pancake densely topped with squid, bacon, and kimchi that inspired a CBS.com food blogger to call it “one of the most beautifully presented lunches [he’s] eaten, truck or not.” The chef either buys each of his dishes’ components locally or flies them in from Japan in tribute to his respect of fine ingredients, tradition, and a 747’s need for a tasty meal. To catch a meal nearby, diners can check the truck’s location online.

E 48th St.
New York,
NY
US

A recurring guest on Martha Stewart Living radio, Simon Feil has not only been a self-described "chef by osmosis his entire life," but an actor and educator who shares his passion with amateur cooks. Feil and his team of chefs teach prospective sushi rollers to craft their own maki in group classes, private lessons, and sometimes even at students? homes. Whether they're teaching individuals or corporate clients, chefs guide their charges through each step to creating platefuls of savory seafood. The variety of classes?which even includes a lesson geared toward pregnant sushi fans?encompasses many different levels of cooking experience and fish-whispering ability. Gift baskets, available for an additional fee, help outfit customers with their own maki-making gear.

140 E 27th St.
New York,
NY
US

A ceiling of exposed brick isn't the only thing that throws off diners' bearings when they enter Izakaya DoDomPa; the eatery's menu of authentic Japanese- and Korean-style pub fare leads guests to wonder if they've traveled across the Pacific without noticing. In addition to freshly sliced sashimi and orders of pan-fried yakisoba noodles, the cooks skewer cubes of pork belly and heap balls of octopus into miniature hot pots. Meanwhile, the bartenders keep spirits high with their drafts of Japanese beer, pours of sake, and shochu cocktails that incorporate flavors such as fresh grapefruit and peach.

Opposite the rustic wooden bar, a row of tables lines a wall beneath a collection of painted portraits and empty sake bottles. At the far end of the bar, one wall sports small scraps of paper from floor to ceiling, recounting the entire plot of the fifth season of Friends in kanji.

71 Clinton Street
New York,
New York City
US

Ceetay's elegantly plated meals of grilled seafood, garlicky fried rice, and tender noodles tossed with colorful veggies tastefully blend the culinary influences of Japan, China, Thailand, and the United States. Like Bruce Springsteen lyrics embroidered onto a wool sweater, the interior evokes a post-industrial mystique that's strangely charming and cozy, with warm light from mason-jar chandeliers bathing small tables surrounded by walls clad in Chinese newsprint. Two small open kitchens allow patrons to watch chefs prepare meals of maple-kissed beef, soba-noodle stir-fry, or hazelnut crème brûlée. Interesting ingredients such as sea urchin, crispy salmon skin, and wagyu beef infuse sushi rolls with rich flavors and textures, and frosty Japanese beers and European and American wines offer suitable complements no matter the diner's dinner selection.

129 Alexander Ave
Bronx,
NY
US

Groupon Guide