Breweries in San Francisco

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The Three Faces of Anchor Brewing Company

San Francisco Legacy Since 1896

Since the brewery poured its first pint back in 1896, the business has changed hands, shut down, reopened, relocated, and retooled countless times. The first brewers, Ernst F. Baruth and his son-in-law Otto Schinkel, Jr., ran the original location for about a decade. Then it all fell apart—Baruth died unexpectedly, a fire destroyed the brewery, and Schinkel was killed by a streetcar. The bad luck didn’t stop there; the next generation had to weather Prohibition, effectively ending Anchor's operations for 13 years. The brewery then operated from 1933 until 1959, when it shut down yet again due to the rising popularity of mass-produced national beers, which were systematically pushing out local brewers. The lean times and sudden upheavals finally began to level out in 1965, when Stanford graduate and Anchor aficionado Fritz Maytag rescued the operation from the clutches of bankruptcy. From then until his retirement in 2010, Maytag carried the business onward and upward, expanding its selection, hiring a larger staff, and even opening an in-house distillery. Today, Anchor operates out of same Mariposa Street location it opened in 1979.

Refined Brewing Methods

Anchor's iconic copper brewhouse hybridizes hundreds of years of traditions and wisdom. The machinery itself is handmade and decades old, but the quality-control systems are anything but dated. Brewers use state-of-the-art methods, including open fermentation, to ensure the beers are as pure and fresh as possible. Still, they manage to marry both the antique and the modern by using an ancient process called dry hopping. A process akin to steeping tea, dry hopping is the art of adding bagged hops to maturing ales—a practice that’s existed for centuries but has just recently come back into vogue.

Pioneering Beers

In 1973, when Anchor only brewed one type of beer, visionary owner Fritz Maytag was seeing the future. Mark Carpenter, Anchor's brewmaster for more than 40 years, recited Maytag's prophetic vision to SF Station: "Down the road there are going to be hundreds of little beers around the country and I don’t just want to be known for Anchor Steam—I want to be known for Anchor Steam, and porter and ale [and so on]." And indeed, since then they've led the microbrewery revolution. "So many of our beers that were the first of their varieties in the U.S. have gone on to be huge,” continues Carpenter, “Liberty Ale is probably the most copied beer in the world—cascade hops are used everywhere now, and we were the first. Old Foghorn barley wine was the first barley wine in the U.S., and we created the first wheat beer."

1705 Mariposa St
San Francisco,
CA
US

Housed within the heart of Golden Gate Park, Park Chalet Garden Restaurant manages to simultaneously embrace its natural surroundings and its contemporary, urban setting. Glass walls and ceilings completely surround the diners, affording them pastoral views of Queen Wilhelmina's windmill and the dutch-tulip garden without sacrificing the comfort of an indoor environment. During warm, sunny days, natural light floods the space and the retractable glass doors slide open to admit warm breezes. The dining room's pendant lamps and immense stone fireplace become invaluable at night, keeping the restaurant brightly lit and the temperatures toasty throughout the evening.

To complement this elegantly cozy ambiance, Executive Chef Matthew Urban and his team devised a menu of familiar comfort foods with subtly refined touches. Smoked paprika oil adds an unfamiliar yet welcome burst of savory flavor to the fried chicken, and cornmeal-crusted trout arrives at tables with an aromatic saffron aioli. Occasionally, the chefs look for inspiration in other cuisines and fuse those flavors with Californian ingredients. Crushed avocados add to the ahi tuna tartare's richness, but the dish's ginger-sesame vinaigrette balances those flavors with a hint of zesty spice.

However, the chefs aren't the only culinary talent at Park Chalet Garden Restaurant. The staff also brews a variety of beers in-house, crafting everything from smoky, German-style märzens to refreshingly hoppy IPAs. As diners enjoy one of these brews with their meal, they can take in the views and applaud the local bands and extraterrestrial magicians that perform every Tuesday evening.

1000 Great Hwy
San Francisco,
CA
US

Pyramid Brewery and Alehouse tantalizes tongues with a malty medley of seasonal and year-round beers, which splash about beside no-nonsense, pub-raised plates. The bright, renovated warehouse space enhances the simplicity of any dish, from the robust bowl of spicy beef chorizo dip, blended with warm cream cheese, provolone, peppers, and bacon ($9), to the Haywire Hefeweisen-infused honey-cilantro chicken, which pairs well with the light body, full flavor, and unchecked telepathy of the Crystal Wheat Ale ($12). Likewise, the zesty aioli suffusing the spicy amber halibut answers the call of the wild by teaming up with the hulking hops and malty tones housed inside the MacTarnahan's Amber Ale ($15).

901 Gilman St
Berkeley,
CA
US

Broken Drum Brewery & Wood Grill's brew masters whip up froth-topped beers, served in-house or to-go in growlers and kegs, to provide a counterbalance to its hefty selection of Southwestern-inspired pub grub. Home brewers channel German brewing tradition to craft obsidian batches of malty bock beers as well as the Terrifico, which fills pint glasses with crisp mexican lager. The grill's platters include chicken mole, which arrives snuggled beneath a blanket of robust mole sauce and melted jack and cheddar cheeses, and grilled mahi-mahi tostadas topped with mango salsa, black beans, and coleslaw. Broken Drum's patio provides a location for sipping libations, and ample opportunities for tossing table scraps to fire hydrants.

1132 4th St
San Rafael,
CA
US